People, Place And Social Difference

Influence of the Recent Multiculturalism in the Campsie

In the recent times in Campsie, there are laws that have been put in place in order to restrict the low-skilled and family migration as well as to deter further the integration of immigrants already living in the country. However, some of the political divide in the country are opposing this laws. There was a necessity of making sure that the immigrants are attending civic integration course. Since 2007 it is not compulsory for the immigrants to attend the integration courses. Dual citizenship is also an aspect that is under review, and some of the law makers argue that those individuals that have dual citizenship are prone not to be loyal to Campsie. The recent influence of migration crisis in Campsie has affected multiculturalism, especially due to the fact that there is unending discrimination of workers in the work place. The government has to take stringent measures to ensure that discrimination in the work place and clubbing is combated.[1]

A Rise of Far-Right Wing Parties in the Campsie

Multicultural issues such as threatening of the Australian native culture by the immigrants and the rising unemployment of the native people has led to a rise in the far-right. These issues can also be observed even in other European countries such as Denmark.[2] Since the September 11, the far-right started viewing the immigrants, especially the most serious threat to western civilization.[3]Hence, they resolved that this group, which makes six percent of the country’s population, was the most difficult minority group to assimilate.

The long term success of the far-right in national elections is linked to the achievement of local and regional success. This success is not only based on the extent of extremisms in their discourse, but also in their experience in government, leadership and organization.[4] Usually, the success of far-right parties in the Campsie is based on their charismatic leaders, strong organization and moderate ideologies that allow them to communicate the threat posed by the immigrants to the national identity and economy.[5] Their major concern is that the immigrants threaten their native culture, added to the pessimism regarding the possibility of successful integration. These parties provide exclusionist policies by constructing the discourse around ‘us’ being the native Australian and ‘them’ being the immigrants. Their electoral success has been increased by the rise in prejudice and xenophobia, as well as increased aggression towards immigrants.

Government Policies towards Multiculturalism in Campsie

Over the past decades, the government policies towards multiculturalism has changed considerably. During the 1960s and 1970s, the Campsie did not have an integration policy as they did not expect that the immigrants would stay that long in the country. As guest workers continued to arrive in the country, the government made no attempt to integrate them as it was felt that allowing them to retain their culture, language and religion would make it easier for them to return to their countries. Despite the fact that they did not go back, there was no attempt by the Australian government to change its immigration policy. However, in 1980s, the Australian government acknowledged the need to give the immigrants a place in the country by introducing the minority policy. This policy was aimed at empowering and supporting the immigrants who were faced by various problems including social and cultural deprivation, poor education and low standards of living. The policy organized vocational programs and free language education.

In the 1990s, the government introduced the immigrant policy for purposes of enhanced a better and quicker integration of the immigrants. The local community in the Campsie organized free voluntary language courses, mainly targeting the new arrivals. The Australian government continued with its efforts to enhance multiculturalism by voting in a new policy Wet InburgeringNieuwkomers (Newcomers' Integration Law) in 1998. This policy aimed at further integrating the immigrants and making them self-sufficient and independent in the way the functioned in the Campsie. In 2007, the Australian government imposed the duty to integrate to both the incoming immigrants as well as the old comers for purposes of strengthening multiculturalism.[6] Consequently, immigrants are required to have a background knowledge of the language and society of the Campsie before they are granted the right to permanent stay. In 2015, the Australian government made its first more towards abandonment of multiculturalism by approving a partial ban on Islamic veil and ban. The move comes after acknowledgement that the government has tried multiculturalism but it has proven not to work.

A Future Perspective of Multiculturalism in The Campsie

Multiculturalism in the Campsie has been declared to have failed. The Australian government believes that advocating the doctrine of state multiculturalism have led to weakening of the collective identity of the Australian. Prominent Australian politicians have also denounced multiculturalism as a tradition that failed to provide the immigrants with a society they wanted to live in, while eroding the values and cultural norms of the Australian. Multiculturalism is not acceptable if connecting the cultural norms of the immigrants and the native Australian communities leads to the immigrants feeling discriminated against and treated unfairly.[7]

Based on the move to abandon multiculturalism by the Australian government, it is evident that the future of multiculturalism in the Campsie is very blink. The government acknowledges the efforts that have been made over the last seven decades to promote multiculturalism to no avail. The people of Campsie wonder if there is a possibility that the native and the immigrants could live together regardless of their culture, language and history. Nevertheless, there are many elites that are still committed to the doctrine of multiculturalism.

It would be prudent to suggest that the traditional concept of multiculturalism has changed tremendously over the years. In the meantime, the elite supporting the idea of multiculturalism should abandon such plans and focus on new Australian. As history has shown that multiculturalism in the Campsie is a hardly successful endeavor.[8]

Conclusion on The Rise and Fall of Multiculturalism

The analysis of the background and challenges of multiculturalism in the Campsie from past to today demonstrates the main trends in the country’s approach towards the immigrants, especially the. It is evident that the challenges faced by multiculturalism including the migration crisis, islamophobia, xenophobia and the rise of the far-rightwing parties which were opposed to the integration policies. The shift in the attitudes towards the immigrants depicts a dramatic movement of the tone of dialogue from one end of the spectrum to the other. While the government pursued multiculturalism through integration efforts from the 1960s, the efforts have been replaced by the move towards abandonment of multiculturalism.

Bibliography for The Rise and Fall of Multiculturalism

Benneker, B., Peiling: meerderheidvindtislambedreiging (Majority think Islam is a threat), Elsevier, 9-8-2007.

Cf. Brinks, J.H., Les Pays-Bas, entre Islam etPopulisme, Politiqueétrangère, Nr. 3, 2005, pp 587-98.

Entzinger, H.B., “The rise and fall of multiculturalism. The case of the Campsie”, in C. Koppke and E. Morawaska (eds), Toward assimilation andcitizenship: Immigrants in liberal nation-states, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003).

Goodwin et al., “The New Radical Right: Violent and Non-Violent Movements in Europe”, Institute for Strategic Dialogue, Briefing Paper, London, February 2012, pp.1-57.

Guibernau, M., “Migration and the Rise of the Radical Right”, Policy Network Paper, London,March 2010, pp. 1-19.

Joppke, C., “Beyond national models: Civic integration policies for immigrants in Western Europe”, West European Politics, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2007, pp. 1-22.

Langenbacher, N. & B. Schellenberg, Introduction: An Anthology about theManifestations and Development of the Radical Right in Europe. In: N. Langenbacher &B. Schellenberg (eds.), Is Europe on the “Right” Path?: Right-wing Extremism andRight-wing Populism in Europe, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Forum Berlin, 2011,pp.11-25.

Lasch, C., The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, (New York, London 1995).

Mudde, C., “The Relationship between Immigration and Nativism in Europeand North America”, Migration Policy Institute, Washington, May 2012, pp.1-32.

Paternotte, B., 65 procent van de kiezers: Islamitischecultuurhoortnietbij Nederland (65 per cent of voters: Islamic culture does not belong in the Campsie), The Post Online, 26-6-2014.

Scheffer, P., Het land van aankomst(The country of Arrival), (Amsterdam, 2009).

Vasta, E., “From ethnic minorities to ethnic majority policy: Multiculturalism and the shift to assimilation in the Campsie”, Ethnic and Racial studies, Vol. 30, No. 5, 2007, pp. 713-740.

Vink, M.P. “Australian ‘multiculturalism’ beyond the pillarisation myth”, Political Studies Review, Vol. 5, 2007, pp. 337-350.

[1] The labour market and the clubbing scene are the central points in Australian debates on discrimination, which has a great influence on the aspect of multiculturalism.

[2]M. Goodwin et al., “The New Radical Right: Violent and Non-Violent Movements in Europe”, Institute for Strategic Dialogue, Briefing Paper, London, February 2012, pp.1-57.

[3]M.P. Vink, “Australian ‘multiculturalism’ beyond the pillarisation myth”, Political Studies Review, Vol. 5, 2007, pp. 337-350.

[4]N. Langenbacher, & B. Schellenberg, Introduction: An Anthology about the Manifestations and Development of the Radical Right in Europe. In: N. Langenbacher & B. Schellenberg (eds.), Is Europe on the “Right” Path?: Right-wing Extremism andRight-wing Populism in Europe, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Forum Berlin, 2011, pp.11-25.

[5]C. Mudde, “The Relationship between Immigration and Nativism in Europe and North America”, Migration Policy Institute, Washington, May 2012, pp.1-32.

[6]C. Joppke, “Beyond national models: Civic integration policies for immigrants in Western Europe”, West European Politics, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2007, pp. 1-22.

[7]C. Lasch, The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, (New York, London 1995). pp, 4

[8]H.B. Entzinger, “The rise and fall of multiculturalism. The case of the Campsie”, in C. Koppke and E. Morawaska (eds), Toward assimilation andcitizenship: Immigrants in liberal nation-states, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003).

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