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Occupation and Occupational Therapy 

Executive Summary of Discipline of Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy's main aim is to allow people to engage in daily activities. Occupational therapists accomplish this result by encouraging people to do activities that will improve their ability to engage or by improving the atmosphere to help promote participation. Consequently, occupational therapy practitioners must recognize these occupational therapy mechanisms and are prepared to use them. Using the Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF), occupational therapists can recognize these main activities to help clients to achieve their job goals. The objective of this essay is to make comparisons occupation-focused designs as well as provide suggestions about how to select and incorporate such methods in practice; as well as provide a comprehensive approach to integrate occupation-focused methods with orientations to support evaluation and response. The CPPF may not, furthermore, describe in-depth how these broader social contextual variables can directly affect the practice process. By working collaboratively and partnership with customers, showing respect for customers, featuring clients in decision-making, and acknowledging the information and expertise of clients, occupational therapists could even make sure they practice in a client-centered way. Client-centered occupational therapy was shown to advertise the standard of living of a client through occupational involvement.

Table of Contents

Introduction.

Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF)

CPPF action points.

Action Point 1: Enter / Initiate.

Action Point 2: Set the stage.

Action Point 3: Assess / evaluate.

Action Point 4: Agree on objectives and plan.

Action Point 5: Implement the plan.

Action Point 6: Monitor and modify.

Action Point 7: Evaluating outcomes.

Action Point 8: Conclude/exit

Contemporary paradigm influence the application of the CPPF.

Conclusion.

References.

Introduction to Discipline of Occupational Therapy

The method of occupational therapy is a complex and changing method with the intended result of improving the freedom, protection, and standard of functional capabilities of the client and increasing involvement in purposeful and meaningful professions. Occupational therapy is an allied health care specialty that requires the constructive utilization of everyday routines or jobs to treat physical, mental, developmental, and behavioral disorders that impair the capacity of an individual to accomplish tasks. Comprehension of its facets and the complex relationship between them help occupational therapists build thinking skills in clinical decision-making and render occupational therapy programs more efficient (Taylor, 2020). Therefore, there seems to be an expectation that all professional behavior and relationships are rooted in some fundamental principles and beliefs. In this text, the core principles and beliefs of occupational therapy are organized across seven fundamental concepts — altruism, justice, independence, fairness, integrity, reality, and restraint. Occupational therapy's main aim is to allow people to engage in daily activities. Occupational therapists accomplish this result by encouraging people to do activities that will improve their ability to engage or by improving the atmosphere to help promote participation (Reitz et al., 2020). In this report, the Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF) have been discussed along with the stages of the framework. Also, the contemporary influence of CPPF has been discussed along with the three stages of the later in detail.

Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF)

Occupational therapists provide specific expertise, skills, and behaviors that enable individuals, groups, and populations to relate to the wellbeing of the profession. As depicted in the CPPF (Craik et al., 2013), the occupational therapy method is a central method that can be used to guide practice in all environments. Consequently, occupational therapy practitioners must recognize these occupational therapy mechanisms and are prepared to use them. The CPPF consists of four components: three contextual components and an element that represents the process of practice. The fourth aspect represents the process of occupational therapy and is represented in eight action points which could be used in their essence and through the method in chosen paths.

Using the CPPF, occupational therapists can recognize these main activities to help clients to achieve their job goals. The societal culture has been defined by a broad, both-encompassing outer box and includes the context of practice defined by the inner box, comprising environmental and personal variables affecting the relationship between the client and therapist. A dotted line distinguishes the context of culture from the context of practice to underline that they are rooted in each other and have reciprocal control. The frame(s) of comparisons penetrate the method of practice as it can shift with the individual or therapist's needs. The action points each includes a component-to-component action that may be tests, strategies, and/or evaluation of outcomes. The CPPF also specifically defines particular details of the practicum process. The CPPF provides consistency, i.e. the versatile mechanism provided by both solid lines (full straight direction) and dotted lines of action (substitute pathways). The framework describes the main enabling abilities and actions for each of the action points. One of the main acts, for example, for both the action point "set the stage," is to engage clients to explain meaning, values, assumptions, aspirations, and desires (Kielhofner, 2009).

CPPF Action Points

The method has versatility, taking account of the contextual elements. The CPPF action points depend on the use of a variety of supporting skills by occupational therapists, including: adjust, promote, mentor, coordinate, discuss, organize, layout/construct, teach, interact, and specialize (Polatajko et al., 2007). A reference to using the eight action points of the CPPF is given below:

Action Point 1: Enter / Initiate

  • Who is the Customer? (A single person, a family, a group, an organization, or a community?)
  • would the client seem to need occupational therapy services?
  • what are all the perceived job challenges of the client?
  • Did the person agree to undergo physical therapy?
  • What service delivery model would seem more fitting to communicate with the customer?

Action Point 2: Set the stage

  • Can you deliver what customer needs?
  • What are the perceived or possible work problems for the client?
  • So what were the client's future occupational targets?
  • Which theoretical structures will direct evaluation processes?

Action Point 3: Assess / evaluate

  • What needs to be evaluated based on the context frame(s) chosen in Action Point 2?
  • How will the test be conducted?
  • What do the results of the test mean concerning the occupational concerns of the client?
  • Will your customer engagement move towards the next point of action or stop at this point? (The interaction will end if: no occupational challenges or priorities are mentioned; the recommendation was for evaluation and advice only; because of such a clash of values leading to a failure in the system, you and the user may want to terminate the partnership.)

Action Point 4: Agree on objectives and plan

  • What is the occupational goal(s) for which the client needs to work?
  • What action-based targets need to be met to attain the target(s)?
  • How will the milestones be accomplished?
  • Does the strategy address job priorities, priorities, history, assessment results, timelines, required resources, the participation of stakeholders, and methods of evaluation?
  • Will your customer engagement move to the next point of action or stop at this point?

(Consider that if you are in the consulting position, the partnership may terminate at this stage, the therapist and the customer may decide that the therapy is are no longer required, or the recommendation may indicate that the consulting finishes with such a plan set up).

Action Point 5: Implement the plan

  • What requires to be improved to get the strategy implemented?
  • Who should act?
  • What enabling abilities do therapists want to use?
  • What point of reference is directing the plan's execution?
  • How does the client participate in the execution of the strategy by occupation?

Action Point 6: Monitor and modify

  • Would be the strategy being pursued as expected?
  • Are strides have been made in the accomplishment of goals and occupational objectives?
  • Have some of the situational factors that influence execution been changed?
  • Are improvements required to ensure good accomplishment?

Action Point 7: Evaluating outcomes

  • Have the prior career objectives, concerns, or problems of the client been resolved by implementing the plan?
  • Are there additional job problems that need to be resolved?
  • Is the partnership of practice to proceed (going back to Action point 4) or to end at this stage?

Action Point 8: Conclude/exit

  • Do you and the client agree that the partnership with practice should conclude?
  • What paperwork is required to complete a final report?
  • For many other programs, are more referrals needed?
  • Is the participant-specific about how to post-enter the practice partnership in occupational therapy if necessary?

The Contemporary Paradigm Influences the Application of the CPPF.

Occupational therapists will be well advised to use profession-focused theories to direct action as medical care progresses toward recognizing the value of work, involvement, and profession. Some therapists recognize that best practice is facilitated by incorporating occupation-focused frameworks, but most do not are using these designs consistently. The lack of awareness of the frameworks and restricted methods to pick and adapt them for full client gain are obstacles to the implementation of the concept. The objective of this essay is to make comparisons occupation-focused designs as well as provide suggestions about how to select and incorporate such methods in practice; as well as provide a comprehensive approach to integrate occupation-focused methods with orientations to support evaluation and response (Pereira, 2017). So many researchers have done about the need to accept the occupation and use this to motivate our clinical practice, study and learning, specific occupational therapists, and eventually, and most importantly, our clients. In actuality, investigation, healthcare, and practice should be guided by a highly qualified ideology and it should be a guiding light when evaluating possible alterations to practice. It is a strong idea that occupational therapists should use our occupational theory, simply better operationalized by the Contemporary Model, collectively and individually to educate EBP (Di Tommaso et al., 2019). Besides, to find oneself once again at a crossing point for the career with the Contemporary Paradigm's occupational theory at times questioned by the incorporation of scientific evidence-based practice. It would urge all occupational therapists to take part in EBP but always keeping in mind the complexities. The therapist believes say that evidence-based decision-making is presented across the prism of the theory of occupational therapy, including occupational therapists asking objectively if or not the 'procedure' for that there is information is compatible with the Contemporary Model (Machingura & Lloyd, 2017). This is a complicated topic, with several outstanding problems to be investigated. We will urge all occupational therapists to challenge how they enforce EBP and acknowledge the degree to which the ideology of the practice influences decisions in training.

The CPPF could be extended to various environments of treatment, could be used in an interdisciplinary environment, and encourages the therapist to participate in the counseling process with both groups and individuals of clients. Training of occupational therapy is complex, and some environments may not recognize all eight steps of action appropriate to obtain the desired result. For example, an occupational therapist who serves as a counselor can shift from stage four of action, deciding on goals or a plan, to leave the relationship and send the individual to some other therapist for follow-up or even further treatment. This could also be the case in an intensive care environment where the duration of stay of a patient may be uncertain (van Hartingsveldt & Piskur, 2017). Even so, the CPPF encourages therapists to adapt the procedure to the particular settings of practice, thus retaining a framework to direct their practice. The therapeutic association with prior assumptions, beliefs, and interactions is entered into by a person. The individual with previous physical impairment experience and a referral to treat physical needs could be more focused on physical problems. Other clients often have their dreams, concerns, and preconceived ideas about what seems to be the objective of the counseling phase. For example, a client might expect that medication works to regain function in the upper limbs, which might have concerns about revealing other people to cognitive difficulties (Leclair et al., 2019). The CPPF stresses and demonstrates the value of prior practice to encourage therapists to focus on the philters they should use to interpret a scenario. The CPPF also emphasizes any need for therapists to be mindful of how all the professional interaction and the method can be affected by environmental and personal variables in practice contexts. The background of the procedure is seen as rooted in a wider social sense, as demonstrated by the CPPF 's outer box. The definition of the CPPF offers examples of wider contextual social influences, including the local habitat. The CPPF may not, furthermore, describe in-depth how these broader social contextual variables can directly affect the practice process (Townsend & Polatajko, 2007). By working collaboratively and partnership with customers, showing respect for customers, featuring clients in decision-making, and acknowledging the information and expertise of clients, occupational therapists could even make sure they practice in a client-centered way. Client-centered occupational therapy was shown to advertise the standard of living of a client through occupational involvement. A stated objective of the CPPF is to allow occupational therapy focused on clients. Several of the additional actions of the CPPF promote involvement and authority-sharing among customers (Townsend & Polatajko, 2007).

Conclusion on Discipline of Occupational Therapy

The CPPF was developed to promote client-centered, evidence-based practice for occupational therapists, and also to engage in reflective practice. The CPPF describes eight key action steps in occupational therapy practice that direct the therapeutic relationship. The CPPF should be used by occupational therapists employed in different environments for individuals that have a wide variety of occupational problems. The CPPF offers a detailed, but the versatile structure that allows the occupational therapist's practice process clear, as evident from the above scenario example. Although the CPPF is sufficiently versatile to accommodate the ever-evolving needs of a wide range of client base and practice contexts, it also offers procedural guidance to practitioners to ensure continuous, deliberate decision-making and reflective practice. The CPPF also needs to take into account the circumstances both of the therapist and the client, thereby further facilitating and supporting client-centered practice.

References for Discipline of Occupational Therapy

Craik, J, Davis, J, & Polatajko, H. (2013). Introducing the Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF): Amplifying the context. In E. Townsend & H. Polatajko (Eds.), Enabling occupation II: Advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well-being, & justice through occupation (2nd ed., pp. 229-246). Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists.

Di Tommaso, A., Wicks, A., Scarvell, J., & Isbel, S. (2019). Experiences of occupation-based practice: an Australian phenomenological study of recently graduated occupational therapists. British Journal of Occupational Therapy82(7), 412-421.

Kielhofner, G. (2009). Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy practice (4th ed.). F.A. Davis.

Leclair, L. L., Lauckner, H., & Yamamoto, C. (2019). An occupational therapy community development practice process. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy86(5), 345-356.

Machingura, T., & Lloyd, C. (2017). Contemporary occupational therapy: Disruption or transformation. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation24(1), 3-4.

Pereira, R. B. (2017). Towards inclusive occupational therapy: Introducing the CORE approach for inclusive and occupation‐focused practice. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal64(6), 429-435.

Polatajko, H. J., Craik, J., Davis, J., & Townsend, E. A. (2007). Canadian practice process framework (CPPF). EA Townsend & HJ Polatajko. Enabling Occupation II: Advancing an Occupational Therapy vision of Health, Well-being, & Justice through Occupation, 233.

Reitz, S. M., Scaffa, M. E., & Dorsey, J. (2020). Occupational Therapy in the Promotion of Health and Well-Being. The American journal of occupational therapy: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association74(3), 7403420010p1-7403420010p14.

Taylor, R. R. (2020). The intentional relationship: Occupational therapy and use of self. FA Davis.

Townsend, E. A., & Polatajko, H. J. (2007). Advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well-being, and justice through occupation. Ottawa, ON: CAOT Publications ACE.«Enabling Occupation II présente une vue en coupe tranversale du MCRO-P pour définir et délimiter le domaine de préoccupation des ergothérapeutes, c’est-àdire l’occupation humaine.

van Hartingsveldt, M., & Piskur, B. (2017). Het Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E) en het Canadian Practice Process Framework (CPPF). Grondslagen van de ergotherapie, (5e druk), 341-356.

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