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  • Subject Name : Consumer Behavior

Consumer Behaviour Theory

Executive Summary of The Campaign

The report highlights the campaign named as the Twix left or right. The report covers the key aspects of consumer behaviour that have been implemented in the campaign. Along with this, the report also presents the underlying process that would be utilised to examine the theories that can help in explaining the aspect and the implementation as done in the campaign. Lastly, the report highlights the critical thinking and response where the areas of the campaign that can prove to be ineffective have been covered. The report depicts humour and emotional attachment as the two main psychological aspects of consumer behaviour that Twix has touched upon through the campaign. The report further provides detail about each of the aspects to ensure a better understanding of these.

Table of Contents

Background of the campaign.

Aspects of consumer behaviour.

Critical thinking and response.

Conclusion.

References.

Background of Twix Left or Right Campaign

With globalisation and the subsequent advancement of technology, each company must aim to gain knowledge and understanding about the behaviour of their target audience in the market place (Dieuaide 2018). Such understanding enables the companies to gain understanding about consumer behaviour and thus formulate the required strategies as per their understanding (Schütte and Ciarlante 2016; Nguyen et al. 2018). One such campaign is named as the Twix - left or right.

The left Twix is a bar named with chocolate, caramel and cookie. On the other hand, the right Twix is made of caramel, cookie and chocolate. The chocolate bar is owned by the company Mars where it was divided into two parts- Left Twix and Right Twix. The left Twix fold the caramel cookie while the right Twix cascaded caramel cookie. The Twix - left or right campaign that began in the year 2012 at the Cannes Lions festival is one of its kind and provides the consumer with the option to chose between the two options (Nikolic and Stankovic 2016). The campaign offers the customers with an option to choose between the left Twix and the right Twix based on the taste and the preferences. Through the campaign, the company has touched upon various aspects of consumer behaviour and therefore attracting the potential customer towards the campaign and also ensuring its success. The report aims to discuss the campaign named Twix left and right. The following sections of the report will highlight the campaign where it will cover the key aspects of the consumer behaviour that have been implemented in the campaign. Along with this, the report will also present the underlying process that would be utilised to examine the theories that can help in explaining the aspect and the implementation as done in the campaign. Lastly, the report has also highlighted the critical thinking and response where the areas of the campaign that can prove to be ineffective have been covered.

Aspects of consumer behaviour

The campaign made use of important aspects of consumer behaviour among which one was the humour. The campaign undertook a comparison of two of the people: custodian and janitor along with ghost and spirit. Each of the pair of people as highlighted in the campaign was same just like the candy bars left and the right Twix. Considering the aspect of humour that is depicted through the ad, the campaign was thus aimed to target the long-lasting impact that it would have on the minds of the target customers. Twix campaign virtually depicted a company being divided into two different parts and where the people trying to open up much better facilities than each other (Shiel et al. 2020). The aspect of humour is the campaign can also be determined from how it has been shown that the people landed up to operate in the same place, just being competitors to each other. Furthermore, the candy bars that they made were almost similar to each other except for some minor changes. The campaign has aimed to cover different storylines on several channels including the television and the social media. This way the campaign has aimed to cover the campaign through various mediums of promotion.

Underlying process

The target audience for the Twix bar is majorly the children and young adults. The campaign aimed at one of the key aspects of consumer behaviour: humour had been targeted to the target audience. The children and young adults tend to get engaged in advertisements and promotional activities that can amuse them and highlight the funny side. Through the campaign, Twix was able to attract the attention of its target audience. Humour can have both a positive and negative impact on the audience. The audience can take the humour that the company tries to demonstrate through its advertisements and the campaigns adversely where the campaign can face criticism. On the other hand, the humour can also have an appositive impact upon the target audience as it can help the company in attracting them and further drawing their attention and ensuring the success of the campaign. People can, therefore, have two different types of reactions to humour. This includes amusement help or hurt. The amuse help ensures that a campaign has been able to depict its funny side while the hurt highlights that the campaign has hurt the feelings and the sentiments of people.

The use of humour in the campaign undertaken by Twix brought success to the company. This is because the target audience especially the children and the young adults were amused by the content of the campaign and the way the storey of the Twix right and left were depicted. Humour thus played a crucial role in determining the outcome of consumer behaviour. The element of humour when added to a promotional campaign helps in gaining the attention of the audience and engaging them with the story. This is humour directs positive behaviour among the customers who look towards the products with an assertive attitude. According to some of the studies, humour, as used as an aspect of the advertisement and promotional activities, helps in engagement and awareness. Thus an advertisement becomes more attractive as compared to when only factual information is added to it.

One of the theories that explain the impact of the aspect of humour as a part of consumer behaviour is the General Theory of Verbal Humour. The theory explains how humour impacts the behaviour of the target audience in a campaign and the way it can direct the outcome of the responses. Twix decision to cover the aspect of humour as a means to shape consumer behaviour towards the brand is an apt one. Twix has noticed through several pieces of research that the target audience covering children and the young adults are more likely to devote their attention to the advertisement and any other kind of promotional activity when they are offered with some of the other content that amuses them through the use of videos, verbal cues and other important components (Wang et al. 2017).

The same can be linked to the Elaborative likelihood model where the model aims to highlight the process for persuasion that identifies the likelihood of an individual to think carefully about a message. This model has been utilised in this campaign where the campaign has aimed to change the taste and the choices of the people by giving them two different choices of bars and thus providing them with the opportunity to consume the bars and then decide which bar is better than the other (Gu et al. 2017; Leong et al. 2019). The campaign has therefore undertaken the combined use of persuasion with an emotional appeal to gain the attention of the consumers and further generate true interest in the campaign through the mobilisation of the cognitive emotions (Funk 2017; Young et al. 2018).

Along with this, another aspect of consumer behaviour that can be linked to the Twix left and the right campaign is the emotional attachment. Emotional attachment is defined as the emotional bond that a consumer has towards a particular product or even a brand. The use of an emotional attachment is made by several marketers around the world to develop their advertisements and promotional campaign. This brings success to the campaigns and ensures that the advertisement or campaign can meet the objectives (Zhou et al. 2016). The Twix campaign has demonstrated how the two people have undertaken the production of the bars. The campaign has depicted chocolate and its processing by engaging the people through a story of two people and giving them with two options to chose, both of which ultimately bring revenue and sales to the company at the end.

Twix- Left and the right campaign has targeted the emotional aspect of consumer behaviour. The company knows that people specifically children and young adults tend to have an emotional attachment with chocolates (Mucundorfeanu 2019). Various studies that depicted that the packaging of chocolates and the way in which they are presented in front of the consumer tend to evoke emotions and affect their willingness to consume it. The campaign has tried to touch upon the emotions of the candy bar lovers and the people who are fond of eating chocolates (Harris et al. 2016). Through the campaign, the company has aimed to offer people with two different bars. The campaign that depicted various storylines across several social media channels and the television channels, has aimed to exploit the tastes and preferences of the young adults where the Twix has brought in two different versions of the bars with little changes in both and thus given the customers with the option of choosing between the two bars (Slavova 2019; Kraus and Gierl 2017).

One of the theories that are tapped through the campaign is “attachment theory”. The theory aims to shed light on the aspects of consumer behaviour including that of branding, consumer emotional biases and the relationship with the product. The attachment theory can be linked to the campaign where the campaign has tried to attract people through providing them with the option to choose between the two Twix bars and thus make their choice based on the attachment that they have with the bars (Mende et al. 2019; Lussier 2019). Another theory that can be linked to the campaign is the Maslow’s need hierarchy theory. The theory covers some of the key needs of every person that covers the basic needs including water, food and shelter. This is followed by the safety and security needs. After this comes the love and belongingness need and followed by the self-esteem and lastly the self-actualisation need (Torres‐Ruiz et al. 2018; Hale et al. 2019).

The campaign covers the basic need of a person concerning food where the chocolate bar would satisfy the hunger of the people. Along with this, the Twix campaign that presents a chocolate bar has also targeted the safety and the security need of the people where chocolate is considered to provide energy to the one who consumes it and can give strength (Hua et al. 2017). Love and belonging needs as a part of the theory is another aspect as targeted by the campaign where the bars can be shared with friends and family where it gives two options either left Twix bar or the right Twix bar (Grimmer and Miles 2018; Hind and Amina 2016). Along with this, the need for esteem is also satisfied, as the bar would make refresh people and provide them with inner confidence. Lastly, the bar would help in various needs and enable in the achievement of dreams and goals. Thus, the theories can help in understanding how the campaign has significantly aimed at pointing out at the emotional attachment that people have to a brand of chocolate and their preference to a particular bar (Almiron-Roig et al. 2018).

Critical thinking and response

In addition to the above aspects of the consumer behaviour that have been highlighted through the campaign, there are some of the aspects of the campaign that can be ineffectual and problematic. It can be analysed that the campaign forgets the ethical aspect. The story that was shared through the campaign where two people divided the company into two parts is somewhat illogical. Some of the people might not be able to get engaged in the campaign that can have a direct impact on the success of the campaign (Rimkute et al. 2016). Along with this, the campaign has brought in a sense of confusion in the minds of the target audience who may start assuming that the company is dividing into two parts and that one bar is better than the other. The campaign that has been aired in television and through online videos has featured unique storylines. The stories may further bring confusion in the minds of the consumer who may perceive each story differently and entirely diverse than the one which the company wants to them to believe and imagine (Guido et al. 2018; Bell and Buchner 2018).

Along with this, the campaign can be ineffective if any of the two sides of the bar is not liked by the consumers. They would not want to pay for a chocolate bar that they do not like and prefer to spend money on either the left Twix or the right Twix, whichever they prefer the most. This will make the campaign ineffective and would not bring success to it (Díaz et al. 2017). Moreover, some of the researches indicate that the cognitive dissonance would lead to the creation of the complication in the mind of the individual. People might not be aware of the existence of two different types of bars which might further add to confuse them (Kaptan 2019).

Conclusion on Twix Left or Right Campaign

From the above discussion and explanation, it can be concluded that consumer behaviour aims at the study of the responses of the consumer on the activities and practices as adopted by a company. The report has highlighted the case of a campaign named as the Twix right or left. The left Twix is a bar named with chocolate, caramel and cookie. On the other hand, the right Twix is made of caramel, cookie and chocolate. The chocolate bar is owned by the company Mars where it was divided into two parts- Left Twix and Right Twix. The left Twix fold the caramel cookie while the right Twix cascaded caramel cookie. The Twix - left or right campaign that began in the year 2012 at the Cannes Lions festival is one of its kind and provides the consumer with the option to chose between the two options. Through the campaign, the company aims to attract people and ensure the success of the activity. The report has highlighted the key aspects of the consumer behaviour that Twix has touched upon through the left Twix and the right Twix campaign. The key aspects that have been illustrated through the campaign are the humour and emotional attachment. The report has further highlighted an underlying process for each of the aspects as covered in the report. The underlying process has further illustrated how the aspect has been covered by the company and the relevant theories that can explain the use and the implementation of the campaign along with the manner in which the aspect would bring in success to the campaign. The report has further depicted the critical thinking and response which would help in determining the way in which the campaign can be considered to be ineffective.

References for Twix Left or Right Campaign

Almiron-Roig, E., Navas-Carretero, S., Emery, P. and Martínez, J.A., 2018. Research into food portion size: methodological aspects and applications. Food & function, 9(2), pp.715-739.

Bell, R. and Buchner, A., 2018. Positive effects of disruptive advertising on consumer preferences. Journal of Interactive Marketing, 41, pp.1-13.

CSP. 2019. Mars Releases 'Left' and 'Right' Twix Packs. [Online]. Available at: https://www.cspdailynews.com/snacks-candy/mars-releases-left-right-twix-packs [Accessed on May 7, 2020].

Díaz, A., Gómez, M. and Molina, A., 2017. A comparison of online and offline consumer behaviour: An empirical study on a cinema shopping context. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 38, pp.44-50.

Dieuaide, P., 2018. Grey zones and triangulation of the employment relationship in globalisation: a business policy approach. Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, 24(3), pp.297-315.

Funk, D.C., 2017. Introducing a Sport Experience Design (SX) framework for sport consumer behaviour research. Sport Management Review, 20(2), pp.145-158.

Grimmer, M. and Miles, M.P., 2017. With the best of intentions: a large sample test of the intention‐behaviour gap in pro‐environmental consumer behaviour. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 41(1), pp.2-10.

Gu, J., Xu, Y.C., Xu, H., Zhang, C. and Ling, H., 2017. Privacy concerns for mobile app download: An elaboration likelihood model perspective. Decision Support Systems, 94, pp.19-28.

Guido, G., Belk, R.W., Rizzo, C. and Pino, G., 2018. Consumer behaviour and the toilet: Research on expulsive and retentive personalities. Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 17(3), pp.280-289.

Hale, A.J., Ricotta, D.N., Freed, J., Smith, C.C. and Huang, G.C., 2019. Adapting Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a framework for resident wellness. Teaching and learning in medicine, 31(1), pp.109-118.

Harris, F., Roby, H. and Dibb, S., 2016. Sustainable clothing: challenges, barriers and interventions for encouraging more sustainable consumer behaviour. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 40(3), pp.309-318.

Hind, G. and Amina, A., 2016. International brand strategy: Case analysis according to the Moroccan Market. Journal of International Business Research and Marketing, 2(1), pp.34-40.

Hua, S.V., Kimmel, L., Van Emmenes, M., Taherian, R., Remer, G., Millman, A. and Ickovics, J.R., 2017. Health promotion and healthier products increase vending purchases: a randomized factorial trial. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 117(7), pp.1057-1065.

Kaptan, Y., 2019. Multiple proximities and national identities: Turkish audiences’ perception of advertising adaptations. Popular Communication, 17(1), pp.18-34.

Kraus, A. and Gierl, H., 2017. Increasing co-product evaluations by using integrative logos. In Advances in Advertising Research VIII (pp. 169-182). Springer Gabler, Wiesbaden.

Leong, L.Y., Hew, T.S., Ooi, K.B. and Lin, B., 2019. Do electronic word-of-mouth and elaboration likelihood model influence hotel booking?. Journal of Computer Information Systems, 59(2), pp.146-160.

Lussier, K., 2019. Of Maslow, motives, and managers: The hierarchy of needs in American business, 1960–1985. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 55(4), pp.319-341.

Mende, M., Scott, M.L., Garvey, A.M. and Bolton, L.E., 2019. The marketing of love: how attachment styles affect romantic consumption journeys. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 47(2), pp.255-273.

Mucundorfeanu, M., 2018. The key role of storytelling in the branding process. Journal of Media Research-Revista de Studii Media, 11(30), pp.42-54.

Nguyen, D.H., De Leeuw, S. and Dullaert, W.E., 2018. Consumer behaviour and order fulfilment in online retailing: a systematic review. International Journal of Management Reviews, 20(2), pp.255-276.

Nikolic, P.K. and Stankovic, J.S., 2016. Social Media Communication: Re-creating the Context of Social Gaming. In Smart City 360° (pp. 559-571). Springer, Cham.

Rimkute, J., Moraes, C. and Ferreira, C., 2016. The effects of scent on consumer behaviour. International journal of consumer studies, 40(1), pp.24-34.

Schütte, H. and Ciarlante, D., 2016. Consumer behaviour in Asia. Springer.

Shiel, C., do Paço, A. and Alves, H., 2020. Generativity, sustainable development and green consumer behaviour. Journal of Cleaner Production, 245, p.118865.

Slavova, G., 2017. Global and domestic bulgarian production of cocoa and chocolate articles for the period 2013-2016. Trakia Journal of Sciences, 15(1), pp.10-17.

The Drum. 2020. Marketing can change the world. [Online]. Available at: https://www.thedrum.com/opinion [Accessed on May 7, 2020].

Torres‐Ruiz, F.J., Vega‐Zamora, M. and Parras‐Rosa, M., 2018. Sustainable consumption: Proposal of a multistage model to analyse consumer behaviour for organic foods. Business Strategy and the Environment, 27(4), pp.588-602.

Wang, L., Fu, L., Li, J., Zeng, X., Xie, H., Huang, X., Wang, H. and Tang, Y., 2018. On an easy way to prepare highly efficient Fe/N-co-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite for oxygen reduction reaction in Al–air batteries. Journal of Materials Science, 53(14), pp.10280-10291.

Young, C.W., Russell, S.V., Robinson, C.A. and Chintakayala, P.K., 2018. Sustainable retailing–influencing consumer behaviour on food waste. Business Strategy and the Environment, 27(1), pp.1-15.

Zhou, T., Lu, Y. and Wang, B., 2016. Examining online consumers’ initial trust building from an elaboration likelihood model perspective. Information Systems Frontiers, 18(2), pp.265-275.

Remember, at the center of any academic work, lies clarity and evidence. Should you need further assistance, do look up to our Consumer Behaviour Assignment Help

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