Mental Health Across the Lifespan

Discuss how trauma can be communicated intergenerationally, describe the effects of intergenerational trauma across the lifespan and succinctly describe therapeutic approaches to facilitate healing and recovery of individuals and communities.

Introduction to Mental Health Across the Lifespan

Through this essay, the purpose is to evaluate how there can be cascading impacts of the Transgenreraitional trauma experienced in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and within the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse populations. It is a step to analyze and access how their has bene a transgenerational psychological trauma theory which is a way ahead of the social consequences and further exploring the tragedy, exploitation, violation of the civil rights, criminal prosecution and having the social-equality gaps, has to lead to the oppression being faced. Intergenerational trauma, or transgenerational trauma, has been identified as the consequences of the untreated trauma-related stress that has been consistently been experiencing as the survivors further pass the second and subsequent generations. It can be traumatic and challenging, which can lead to long term implications (Roden, 2016). As per the Intergenerational trauma is often experienced as one family transits from the one phase of the parents or grandparents who experienced the traumatization and subsequently have experienced the series of each generation and how the family has continued to suffer due to the traumatic experience as a result of an experience in some form. As identified how there has been a source of the tragic event, which can be traced back to a devastating event, and further continues to haunt the family (Sykes, 2018).

Influences and Impacts

It is evident, that some Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian children have also grown up that can cause the safe homes and attain a safe community, that can lead to the cascading impacts, and how the Indigenous children, who would experience and feel traumatic that would the trauma of past events, that can result in the displacement from Country, obligated in the institutionalization and abuse. As explained how there can be the Stolen Generations that can be represented the trauma. As in 2008, to understand the 8% of Indigenous people aged 15 who have removed from the given the natural family and 38% relatives that can be obligated with the removed that can consequent natural family.

The intergenerational trauma would be passed in the subsequent consequences of how they can be the children (inter-generational trauma). To understand how the Indigenous children can represent the higher instances of the distressing life events and how it can lead to wellness and accidents, hospitalization and can even cause death to the close family members, can also handle the exposure to violence, can cause the family disintegration (with kin networks and how it would result in the forced removals, relationship breakdown and how it would possibly incarceration) along with the financial stress (Okeke-Ogbuafor, 2018). To further understand how one can be consistent experiencing as to how there can be the trauma in the childhood that can lead to the severe and long-lasting effect and how it would become a substantial basis to the appropriate interventions. It is also important as to how one can handle it would lead to substantial changes and overcome the design and delivery of trauma-informed along with experiencing the trauma-specific children’s services and care (Nasca, 2019).

Trauma can also lead to cascading events and it can be experienced in the long term that can lead to the overwhelming experience as an individual (Sykes, 2018). It is also essential to note, how there can be threats (real or perceived) which can have high repercussion effects, as to how there can be an individual's physical or emotional wellbeing. To understand how there can be a key person’s response that can represent the intense fear, helplessness, or horror, and to match with the children, that can lead to a response experiencing a disorganized or agitated behavior. It is important to understand how the complex trauma that can result in the problem of an individual’s exposure and how to represent the multiple or prolonged traumatic events which would lead to a categorical fit psychiatric criteria aimed for post-traumatic stress disorder. To understand how there can be a consequent obligation, how there can be typically how there can be interpersonal nature, and how to represent the psychological maltreatment and how it can lead to having the neglect, physical and there can be a consequent sexual abuse.

It is necessary how there can be events that can be obligated representing how there can be childhood (to represent the, early life-onset) and how there can be identified to relate with the individual’s life span (Chiang, 2015). Further, to understand how there can be determined in the Indigenous Australian children that can have the substantial experience trauma ( that can result in the one-time or ongoing events) which can cause the own direct experience and to represent the second exposure and that can identify the heightened risk of experiencing that can consider the complex trauma. In intergenerational trauma, the primary cause of the trauma can be the obligation to the abuse, neglect along with exposure to violence (Cicognani 2019). As per the understanding, there can be the obligation that can be based on the Indigenous children that can lead to the 5.4 times and how there can be non-Indigenous children which can be based on the experience that can consequent to the hospital separation and how it would result in the assault, eight times and then the substantial basis to the child abuse and how there can be dependence to the neglect and 15 times and can represent the juvenile justice supervision (Corbin, 2018). It is important to understand how there can be family and household factors and how to represent the children that can identify the direct risk of traumatization. Based on the Western Australian Aboriginal Child Health Survey that can be based on the range of factors that can result in the children that can identify the experiencing distress:

  • poor physical, along with the basis of the mental health of carers, and how there can be the substantial basis of the substance misuse (including tobacco and alcohol)
  • It is also important to understand the consequence of the poor physical, experiencing the mental health that can result in the child (particularly hearing, speech and vision impairment)
  • The repercussion effect of the economic deprivation (poverty, can result in the substandard or lack of housing)
  • Further, to represent the poor family functioning (money concerns, including the communication problems or l, can be base don the limited support networks) (Corbin, 2018).
  • Adequate poor-quality parenting ( that can represent the past experiences that can result in the abuse and neglect and how to have the negative influence that can represent the parenting capacity)
  • Subsequent exposure based on the racism, discrimination along with identification based on the social marginalization (that covers the socially disadvantaged or excluded communities) (Estacio,, 2017)

Secondary exposure that can be caused due to the trauma can also have the cascading impacts is due to the Indigenous children. It was an important event to understand how there can be a substantial basis for the trauma resulting and how there can be the colonization of Indigenous populations. During the key consequence is intergenerational trauma and how there can be the trauma would be based on the first generation of survivors and how to experienced (or witnessed) that can be substantial on the basis of the second and further generations that can further even lead to the descendants of the survivors. Subsequently how there can be the historical trauma and how it would cause the type of trauma transmitted that would cover the entire generations (the substantial basis of the intergenerational trauma). It is important to understand how there can be the subjective experiencing and events leading to the remembering of events and how there can be the basis of the mind of an individual and how it can lead to the life of a community that can be passed depending on the adults to children and cyclic processes that can represent the ‘cumulative emotional and how it can be representing the psychological wounding (Magee, 2014). It is important to understand the historical trauma past of the collective, cultural memory that can be identified based on the people that can be passed on the same (Kegler, 2017).

Helpful Interventions, in Partnership with Consumers, to Common Mental Health Conditions

It is important to intervene and represent the community-based healing programs that can be supported in line with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing and how it is important to represent the emotional wellbeing that can handle the Indigenous people. It is important to understand the Stolen Generations, and how they can be the basis of the appropriate training that can be resulting in the people to deliver and overcome the healing. As per the foundation, it is important to understand and it is essential that can be funded $53 million for 8 years that can be part of the 2016–17 (McNeish, 2019). Programs supported by the Foundation aim to improve mental health and how it can lead to the cascading impacts that can channelize the Indigenous communities and it is important to use the healing services and further can cause the traditional healing, education that can represent the trauma and to represent the grief and loss and how it has been made it as a part of the professional workforce. It is important to understand the loss, grief, and trauma and how to make them an exclusive part of the communities. The trauma can be due to the suicide prevention and ways to represent the depression, violence and it is essential to have the incarceration, substance abuse and further can lead to the intergenerational trauma that can conclude the healing (Mendes, 2018).

Renewal of The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing Framework

The Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing is essential to represent the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing Framework, and further can be helpful to relate with the cross-jurisdictional and working group that can represent the development. To handle the framework and how to finalize late 2013, that has been part of the extensive consultation process.

The Social and Emotional Wellbeing Program

During 2011, the importance of the Australian Government can be concluded based on the Social and Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB) Program. The prime purpose of the SEWB Program and how to have an engaging enhance service delivery to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people along with the possibility of the communities, prioritizing members and aim for the Stolen Generations, that can conclude the flexible models of service delivery along with holding an engaging practice for the increased capacity that can meet the demand for services (Magee, 2014). As per the program, the basis is the-:

  • Link-Up services and covers the extensive eight locations across Australia, that can aim to cover entire family tracing, reunions and also be applied per the counseling that can cover the Stolen Generations.
  • SEWB counseling services, would also cover the counseling support and can help the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, prioritizing members and can be an emphasis on the needs and the wants of the Stolen Generations, and the entire 90 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations across Australia. During the 2012–13, through the role of the 160 counselor positions over the states and territories (Mendes, 2018).
  • SEWB workforce support can even provide the engaging training with the eight Workforce Support Units and holding the nine Indigenous Registered Training Organisations part of Australia.
  • To extensively support the needs of the Stolen Generations peak organizations and can cover the National Sorry Day Committee along with the National Stolen Generations Alliance.
  • To include the National coordination and support that has been part of the assistance that can cover the Link-Up services for family and even make a concrete part of the Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (Nasca, 2019).

 The Mobile Outreach Service Plus

The Mobile Outreach Service Plus (MOS Plus) to cover and also belong to the outreach service delivering culturally safe counseling and also extensively support the Aboriginal children. It even helps to control the families along with the communities that have been an extensive part of the Northern Territory and have held the trauma associated due to child abuse or neglect. It is also important to be based on the key access to external professional development and also covering the entire community education that can also handle the increase of community members’ and local agencies’ and the one who understands how there has been a radical child abuse along with experiencing the related trauma. MOS Plus has been one step shop, that has helped to contact and be in sync to the Northern Territory Office of Children along with the Families in the Department of Education and even covers the Children’s Services that are part of the National Partnership Agreement on Stronger Futures (Okeke-Ogbuafor, 2019).

Conclusion on Mental Health Across the Lifespan

To conclude, the It is a step to analyze and access how there have been a transgenerational which is a way ahead of the social consequences and further exploring the tragedy, exploitation, violation of the civil rights, criminal prosecution and having the social-equality gaps, has to lead to the oppression being faced. Intergenerational trauma, or transgenerational trauma, has been identified as the consequences of the untreated trauma-related stress that has been consistently been experiencing as the survivors further pass the second and subsequent generations. It can be traumatic and challenging, which can lead to long term implications. As per the Intergenerational trauma is often experienced as one family transits from the one phase of the parents or grandparents who experienced the traumatization and subsequently have experienced the series of each generation and how the family has continued to suffer due to the traumatic experience as a result of an experience in some form. As identified how there has been a source of the tragic event, which can be traced back to a devastating event, and further continues to haunt the family.

References for Mental Health Across the Lifespan

Chiang, R., Meagher, W. & Slade, S. (2015). How the whole school, the whole community, whole child model works: Creating greater alignment, integration, and collaboration between health and education. Journal of School Health, 85(11): 775-84 https://onlinelibrary-wiley-com.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/doi/full/10.1111/josh.12308

Cicognani, E., Albanesi, C., Valletta, L. & Prati, G. (2019). Quality of collaboration within health promotion partnerships: Impact on the sense of community, empowerment, and perceived projects' outcomes. Journal of Community Psychology, 48(2): 323-36 https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22254

Corbin, J., Jones, J. & Barry, M. (2018). What makes intersectoral partnerships for health promotion work? A review of the international literature. Health Promotion International, 33 (1): 4–26, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/heapro/daw061

Cornwall, A. (2018). Unpacking 'Participation': models, meanings, and practices. Community Development Journal, 43 (3): 269–283, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/cdj/bsn010

Estacio, E., Oliver, M., Downing, B., Kurth, J. & Protheroe, J. (2017). Effective Partnership in Community-Based Health Promotion: Lessons from the Health Literacy Partnership. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(12), https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121550

Kegler, C., Norton, B. & Aronson, R. (2017). Skill improvement among coalition members in the California Healthy Cities and Communities Program. Health Education Research, 22(3): 450–457, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/her/cyl109

Magee, W., Maltsberger, B., Johnson, L. & Adams, J. (2014). Collaboration: finding the place for Cooperative Extension in the intersection of community development and health promotion. Community Development, 45(1): 90-102 https://www-tandfonline-com.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/doi/full/10.1080/15575330.2013.850107

McNeish, R., Rigg, K., Tran, Q. & Hodges, S. (2019). Community-based behavioral health interventions: Developing strong community partnerships. Evaluation and Program Planning, 73: 111-115 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2018.12.005

Mendes, P. (2018). Community as a ‘spray-on solution’: A case study of community engagement within the income management program in Australia. Community Development Journal¸53(2): 210-227, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/cdj/bsx008

Nasca, T., Changfoot, N. & Hill, S. (2019). Participatory planning in a low-income neighborhood in Ontario, Canada: building capacity and collaborative interactions for influence, Community Development Journal, 54(4): 622–642, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/cdj/bsy031 (Note: You must be logged into the ACU library to access this eBook)

Okeke-Ogbuafor, N., Gray, T. & Stead, S. (2018). A comparative analysis of the role of traditional and modern community-based organizations in promoting community development in Ogoniland, Nigeria. Community Development Journal, 53(1): 173-189, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/cdj/bsw018

Roden, J., Jarvis, L., Campbell-Crofts, S. & Whitehead, D. (2016). Australian rural, remote, and urban community nurses' health promotion role and function. Health Promotion International, 31(3): 704-14. DOI: 10.1093/heapro/dav018.

Sykes, S., Wills, J. & Popple, K. (2018). The role of community development in building critical health literacy.Community Development Journal, 53(4): 751-767, https://doi-org.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au/10.1093/cdj/bsx019

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