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  • Subject Name : Arts and Humanities

Disability Citizenship and Digital Capital

Introduction to Small Arts Enterprise of Australia

Art has been an integral part of almost all the cultures across the world. It refers to a wide range of human activities involved in creating auditory, visual and performing artworks that mostly expresses the conceptual ideas, imagination and technical skills of an artist. It is primarily related to the innovative skills and creativity of an individual and closely relates to the lives of people all over the world. One of the greatest assets of Australia is its artists as their role in creating the identity, culture and workforce of the country is invaluable. They hold great minds and adds immensely towards the creativity and innovation in different aspects. Ever since the existence of the humanity race starts, art and artists has contributed towards growth and development of society, literature and different art forms. Arts has always been regarded as a creative sector and this needs to be properly nurtured. Indigenous groups are the native of the country and their contributions is significant towards the field of art and this needs to be analysed so that the same could be preserved and cultured for a long time (Abbott, M., Barraket, J., Erin, I., Castellas, P., Hiruy, K., Suchowerska, R., & Ward-Christie, L. (2019).

According to a report, remote art centres of Australia generate almost $53 million through selling the art during the year 2008 – 2012. On the similar note, contribution of the cultural sector is almost $60 billion towards the overall GDP of the country. This accounts to a total of more than $4.2 billion only from the filed of arts towards the overall economic growth of Australia. Considering this, small arts enterprise has emerged in recent years with an aim of becoming self-independent along with adding towards the growth and economic development of the country. This work will focus on a small arts enterprise named The Social Studio. Although there are a number of such similar Small Arts Enterprise, what is interesting about this group is that this is a non-profit making organization that aim towards engaging the young Australian coming from some migrant or refugee background and do not have access to education and other means of fundamental rights. This organization is a fashion and clothing enterprise that is focused on designing, manufacturing, retailing and providing training based on fashion, style and clothing. 

Small Arts Enterprise

Small Arts Enterprise is a part of the creative industry that include a number of activities that adds to the economy. They mostly add to the social benefit more than personal profit and interest. They mostly focus on three major sectors, arts, money and society for making people independent. One of the greatest assets of Australia is its artists as their role in creating the identity, culture and workforce of the country is invaluable. They hold great minds and adds immensely towards the creativity and innovation in different aspects. Ever since the existence of the humanity race starts, art and artists has contributed towards growth and development of society, literature and different art forms. Arts has always been regarded as a creative sector and this needs to be properly nurtured. Indigenous groups are the native of the country and their contributions is significant towards the field of art and this needs to be analysed so that the same could be preserved and cultured for a long time.

Role of the Cultural Policy in Australia

According to Curran, Keating rejected the idea that globalization necessitated the abolition of the nation-state and instead supported “an enduring, central role for government in a globalized world”. In 1994, Keating released Creative Nation (Commonwealth of Australia 1994), the first comprehensive cultural policy statement by a sitting government (previous statements had tended to be part of a political party’s prelection policy) and it has set the benchmark for Australian cultural policy in all its subsequent iterations. Creative Nation declared that “being open to the world” and not cultural protectionism would preserve Australia’s fragile national cultural identity. As long “as we are assured about the value of our own heritage and talents,” Australia could only benefit from the “meeting of imported and home-grown cultures”. Thus, the AUD $250 million in additional funding that it promised to cultural institutions over four years was geared toward strengthening the diversity of cultural activities in Australia and promoting cultural uniqueness. In Creative Nation, the government identified five broad categories for defining the role of cultural development: “nurturing creativity and excellence; enabling all Australians to enjoy the widest possible range of cultural experience; preserving Australia’s heritage; promoting the expression of Australia’s cultural identity, including its great diversity; and developing lively and sustainable cultural industries, including those evolving with the emergence of new technologies”.

This new policy framework was significant for a number of reasons. It focused a new and heightened level of public recognition of the contribution of cultural production to the national economy. It insisted that “culture” be seen and understood as a larger and more diverse category of activity than that implied by the “arts.” It recognized, for example, the importance of the new multimedia and digital arts. It also provided a means of raising the political clout of the cultural industries because for the first-time communications and the arts were ensconced in the one portfolio that “positioned ‘culture’-or rather, cultural production-in a pivotal position at the centre of governmental strategy”. Creative Nation also encapsulated a new way of understanding the roles and purposes of culture by putting forward “an industry/economic argument for culture’s significance to the nation”.

Three Year Developmental Plan

One of the greatest assets of Australia is its artists as their role in creating the identity, culture and workforce of the country is invaluable. They hold great minds and adds immensely towards the creativity and innovation in different aspects. Ever since the existence of the humanity race starts, art and artists has contributed towards growth and development of society, literature and different art forms. Arts has always been regarded as a creative sector and this needs to be properly nurtured. Indigenous groups are the native of the country and their contributions is significant towards the field of art and this needs to be analysed so that the same could be preserved and cultured for a long time.

How to attract Funding at Local and State Level

In economic terms, arts have significantly contributed towards the economic development of the country and this is the main analysis to evaluate the value the filed of arts is adding to the nation. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), each year almost $47.6 billion value of cultural production is produced which is adding almost $22.4 billion to the overall profit. These numbers are significant and this also this indicates that arts should be taken seriously and should be focused for funding for overall economic growth and development of the country. Taking this into consideration, both Federal government and the state government have launched many programs for generating funds for this field.

Conclusion on Small Arts Enterprise of Australia

Art has been an integral part of almost all the cultures across the world. It refers to a wide range of human activities involved in creating auditory, visual and performing artworks that mostly expresses the conceptual ideas, imagination and technical skills of an artist. It is primarily related to the innovative skills and creativity of an individual and closely relates to the lives of people all over the world. One of the greatest assets of Australia is its artists as their role in creating the identity, culture and workforce of the country is invaluable. They hold great minds and adds immensely towards the creativity and innovation in different aspects. Ever since the existence of the humanity race starts, art and artists has contributed towards growth and development of society, literature and different art forms. Arts has always been regarded as a creative sector and this needs to be properly nurtured. Indigenous groups are the native of the country and their contributions is significant towards the field of art and this needs to be analysed so that the same could be preserved and cultured for a long time. According to a report, remote art centres of Australia generate almost $53 million through selling the art during the year 2008 – 2012.

On the similar note, contribution of the cultural sector is almost $60 billion towards the overall GDP of the country (Abbott, M., Barraket, J., Erin, I., Castellas, P., Hiruy, K., Suchowerska, R., & Ward-Christie, L. (2019)). This accounts to a total of more than $4.2 billion only from the field of arts towards the overall economic growth of Australia. Considering this, small arts enterprise has emerged in recent years with an aim of becoming self-independent along with adding towards the growth and economic development of the country. This work will focus on a small arts enterprise named The Social Studio. Although there are a number of such similar Small Arts Enterprise, what is interesting about this group is that this is a non-profit making organization that aim towards engaging the young Australian coming from some migrant or refugee background and do not have access to education and other means of fundamental rights. This organization is a fashion and clothing enterprise that is focused on designing, manufacturing, retailing and providing training based on fashion, style and clothing. Small Arts Enterprise is a part of the creative industry that include a number of activities that adds to the economy.

They mostly add to the social benefit more than personal profit and interest. They mostly focus on three major sectors, arts, money and society for making people independent. In economic terms, arts have significantly contributed towards the economic development of the country and this is the main analysis to evaluate the value the field of arts is adding to the nation. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), each year almost $47.6 billion value of cultural production is produced which is adding almost $22.4 billion to the overall profit. These numbers are significant and this also this indicates that arts should be taken seriously and should be focused for funding for overall economic growth and development of the country. Taking this into consideration, both Federal government and the state government have launched many programs for generating funds for this field.

References for Small Arts Enterprise of Australia

Abbott, M., Barraket, J., Erin, I., Castellas, P., Hiruy, K., Suchowerska, R., & Ward-Christie, L. (2019). Evaluating the labour productivity of social enterprises in comparison to SMEs in Australia. Social Enterprise Journal.

Atkinson-Phillips, A. (2019). Settled and Unsettled: The Spirit of Enterprise Project as (Post) Settler-Colonial Memory Activism. In Remembering Migration (pp. 271-283). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Bartleet, B. L., Sunderland, N., O’Sullivan, S., & Woodland, S. (2019). Creative Barkly: Sustaining the Arts and Creative Sector in Remote Australia.

Cole, N. A., & Wallis, L. A. (2019, December). Indigenous Rock Art Tourism in Australia: Contexts, Trajectories, and Multifaceted Realities. In Arts (Vol. 8, No. 4, p. 162). Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute.

Darcy, S., Yerbury, H., & Maxwell, H. (2019). Disability citizenship and digital capital: the case of engagement with a social enterprise telco. Information, Communication & Society22(4), 538-553.

Dooley, K. (2019). Teaching Screen Arts in Australia: Challenges, Opportunities and Current Trends. In The Palgrave Handbook of Screen Production (pp. 427-441). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Jones, J., Seet, P. S., Acker, T., & Whittle, M. (2019). Barriers to grassroots innovation: The phenomenon of social-commercial-cultural trilemmas in remote indigenous art centres. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 119583.

King, P. (2019). Small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) translation service provider as technology user. The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Technology.

Opara, S. C., Stanton, P., & Wahed, W. (2019). For love or money: human resource management in the performing arts. Employee Relations: The International Journal.

Yan, L., Yinghong, Y., Lui, S. M., Whiteside, M., & Tsey, K. (2019). Teaching “soft skills” to university students in China: The feasibility of an Australian approach. Educational Studies45(2), 242-258.

Wright, C. E. (2019). The Boarding Pass: Pathways to Corporate Networks in Early Twentieth-century Australia. Australian Historical Studies50(4), 441-462.

Remember, at the center of any academic work, lies clarity and evidence. Should you need further assistance, do look up to our Arts Assignment Help

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